Tag Archives: money

It’s Been a Minute

I have not tended to this space for quite some time, but it’s been for a good reason. I love my blog, but I’d rather get paid to write. So, for the past two years, I’ve been a paid contributor to Romper and it’s been a wonderful outlet for me to yap about:

For those who’d love to see all my pieces on Romper in one place (I know who you are… Mom), visit here. I roll out about three pieces a week, so there is always new content to check out.

And yes, I still have my day job, creative directing video and editorial for Content Marketing teams.

Thanks for stopping by! I know you’re busy, but I also know you love procrastinating by poking around the internet, so I’m glad to help you with that.

 

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I Wish I Had More Time!

No I don’t.

More time is what I THOUGHT I wanted. More time to get the pantry re-organized, squeeze another load of laundry in, do a bigger puzzle with the kids, write overdue thank you notes, revise the show budget for the network.

Turns out I just want more CONTROL over the time I have.

With my new gig as development head for a production company that’s in a nascent stage, I took a sizable pay cut. For now. I am developing a few show ideas and films and the series that was just greenlit is not yet in contract, so I’m not making very much. Yet. I knew this going in; the difference in pay from my corporate job is startling but here is what I’m getting in return:

  • A CHOICE of projects.
  • A forum to develop my own ideas and shepherd others’ utilizing my skills as a storyteller and an instinctive nurture.
  • An office way the f*ck south of midtown, thank you (yes, that makes a HUGE difference).
  • Flexibility, in the short term, with how much and where I choose to work.

In our start-up phase, it’s understood that there won’t be much money. So my new work partners are very understanding when I say: “Hey, I’ll be offsite the next two days. I can do calls before 3 if need be.” And then get some work tasks done, in between blog writing and bonus parenting that I didn’t get a chance to do while at my last job.

So today I’m scheduled to appear in Campbell’s Cupcakes Class to read “The Cat in the Hat” as part of his daycare’s monthlong celebration of Dr. Seuss’s birthday.

More Thing 2 than Cat, but still...

More Thing 2 than Cat, but still…

And I’m picking my daughter up from the bus and bringing her with me. Her kindergarten class honored the author last week.

Say "Seuss" because that will make for great mouth placement in the photo.

Say “Seuss” because that will make for great mouth placement in the photo.

I actually don’t prefer working from home. I’m not as productive because I’m trying to combine work and life projects. Multi-tasking kills. It’s why it’s illegal to text and drive. And like Ron Swanson says:

“Never half-ass two things. Whole ass one thing.”

So I do make a point to get to the office for meetings and to get sh*t done. But on days when I have a captive audience of 2-year-olds for storytime, or I just need a haircut, I’m happy to be at home. I’m trying to making it count now, because I DO want to work. I DO want to be busy with projects I’m passionate about. And I DON’T want to start worrying about money.

I have 3 ½ weeks of unused vacation time that I’m being paid out from my last job. So I guess I’m kind of using it now. Going on school trips, having morning coffee with friends I don’t get to see much, not having those knock-down, drag-out tussles with myself about how to spend the fleeting minutes.

Then it’s go time. Because I really can’t see myself getting into the pantry renovation. I’m just not that girl.

What’s YOUR ideal work schedule?

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Taking it to the Bank

“Mom, can I have a paper money?” my almost 5-year-old asked when I told her we were stopping at the bank on the way to the playground.

“What do you need it for?” I asked.

“I want to buy money with it at the bank.  A lot of these.”  She held up a dime.

Indeed, ten shiny dimes were a lot more fun than a faded dollar bill.

“What will you do to earn your dollar?”

“What do YOU do to get money?”

“I work.  I do things my company needs me to do, and they pay me money for doing the job.  What job can YOU do to earn money?  Will you help me sort the laundry next time?”

“Yes!” Charlotte squealed.  “I can definitely do that.”  And she earned her dollar, which we then exchanged for ten dimes, which she asked me to hold while we were the playground, and would have stayed in my pocket had she NOT helped me sort the laundry, when they came tumbling out of my shorts as she was tossing them in the colors pile.

Ok, I think we need a better banking system.
Luckily there is one, designed for me to use WITH her.  PNC Bank’s “S is for Savings” program.

I don’t feel drilling down on the coin denominations would serve Charlotte best right now.  But I can start clueing her in on what role money plays in our lives (in good economic times and bad).

Searching for coins to add to her savings.

As I described in an earlier post, “S is for Savings” is PNC Bank’s online programming designed for kids and their caregivers.  It’s a fun, interactive way to introduce pre-schoolers to good financial habits.

Together, you and the little one can actually SEE money you deposit (that they’ve earned sorting laundry or received as birthday gifts) and put it in its designated jar: Saving, Sharing or Spending.

Tips from some fave Sesame Street characters make for an engaging atmosphere to learn the basics.  And yes, I mean mostly for me.

PNC is providing terrific guidelines to enhance how Scott and I are already helping our little achiever develop the right approach to money.

Log on here to get a demo and learn more:
http://www.pncsites.com/sisforsavings/

Here’s hoping Charlotte doesn’t up her laundry sorting rate…

DISCLOSURE:
I was asked by PNC Bank to write this sponsored blog post.  I  would not partner with any sponsor whom I didn’t feel had a quality product my readers would be interested in.  I will continue to be a trusted resource in the blogosphere and only agree to write sponsored posts that are in line with my own best practices as a parent.

 

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“S” is for Savings

Now that Campbell is 2 and more likely to mouth off at me than to put foreign objects into his mouth, I thought he might get a kick out of playing with Charlotte’s old play cash register.  He loved lining up the “coins” in their proper spots and pushing the right button to make them disappear into the drawer.

Unfortunately, you can’t earn interest on primary-colored coins.

But he had no idea this was about MONEY.  It was just a game.

My first lesson in what money meant was in first grade, when we had our bank books.  Remember those?  But even by participating in that savings plan, I don’t think it really dawned on me that fifty cents, every two weeks, noted in this little book, was valuable.  I didn’t get excited about scribbling the amount in the ledger.  It was just more number-writing practice, to my six-year-old self.

But now there’s a way little kids can understand how money works…for them.

PNC Bank’s “S is for Savings” is an easy online banking experience that allows parents and their kids to set goals for saving, sharing and spending.

There are no service charges for account holders under 18, and interest is earned on balances starting at just $1.

You just need an internet connection and a lap,  since it’s designed specifically for parents and kids to use together, sparking conversation about money.

With Campbell, the extent of our financial discussions go a little like this:
Campbell: “Me ride skateboard.”
Me: “We don’t have one.”
Campbell: “Mommy buy.”

Not so fast, kid.

PNC’s “S is for Savings” feature is designed for young children up to age 8.  It allows them to set goals and track their progress in a fun, visual environment, complete with sound effects and animation.  Kids can easily see how much money they have and literally drag and drop their money into jars, which represent how they want to divide their money.  For Campbell, he would need a jar for “Machinations of joy-riding that will cause my mother acute anxiety including, but not exclusive to, skateboards.”

There’s also online allowance.  Parents can transfer money from their own account using an “auto save” feature.  If the kids have cleaned up all their cash register coins, of course.

“S is for Savings” can offer guidance for parents and caregivers to help young children create strong financial habits from a very early age.  I love that PNC has created a learning tool that not only teaches kids the value of money, but enrolls their guardians  in a way that strengthens the family bond since it’s an activity we can do together.

Log on here to get a demo and learn more:
http://www.pncsites.com/sisforsavings/

How are YOU teaching your kids about money?

DISCLOSURE:
I was asked by PNC Bank to write this sponsored blog post.  I  would not partner with any sponsor whom I didn’t feel had a quality product my readers would be interested in.  I will continue to be a trusted resource in the blogosphere and only agree to write sponsored posts that are in line with my own best practices as a parent.

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